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Your Pre-Retirement Checklist

Your Pre-Retirement Checklist

Retirement is not what it used to be. There are many options for making the transition from full time work to being fully retired, ranging from early retirement to late retirement or a gradual shift through working part-time or choosing a less stressful job. Along with all these choices comes the dilemma of when and how to retire. It can be a nervous time because it is not always easy to get back into the workforce once you have left. So before you take the big leap, here are some things to consider:

  • What kind of retirement do you want and how much will it cost? Do a budget for weekly living expenses and big one-off expenses like travel and replacing your car.
  • Consider what your income will be, taking into account NZ Superannuation, other pensions, other Government benefits and any part-time work.
  • Calculate how big your retirement nest egg will need to be to finance your retirement lifestyle. There is a good retirement calculator at sorted.org.nz.
  • Review your current financial situation. Have you paid off all debt? Do you have a well thought through investment strategy that will enable you to achieve your retirement goals? Do you have some cash on hand as well as longer term investments? Have your insurance policies been reviewed?
  • Do a ‘dry run’. Try living for a few months on what your retirement income will be and see how it feels. Not only will this allow you to see how tolerable your retirement lifestyle will be; it will also allow you to save a bit more.
  • Do your financial housekeeping. Make sure your Will is up to date, set up Enduring Powers of Attorney and ensure all your important financial records are stored tidily and safely.

Now you are ready to make your choice!

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Traps for KiwiSaver Home Buyers

Traps for KiwiSaver Home Buyers

One of the best incentives for young people to join KiwiSaver is the ability to withdraw funds for the purchase of a first home. All but $1,000 can be withdrawn providing certain criteria are met. You need to have been a KiwiSaver member for at least three years and you must not have owned property before unless special circumstances apply. A Home Start grant of up to $5000 per person for an existing house and $10,000 for a new house is also available if your income and the value of the house you are buying are within certain limits, and you may also be eligible for a Welcome Home Loan, for which you only need a 10% deposit.

There are some traps to watch out for. If you purchase or inherit a piece of land on which to build a house, after that time you will not be a first home owner and you will not be able to withdraw your KiwiSaver funds. Funds transferred into your KiwiSaver from an Australian superannuation scheme are not available to purchase a house. To be eligible for a Home Start grant, you need to have been a contributing member of KiwiSaver for three years or more. If you stop work, for example by going on maternity leave, you may need to keep up contributions at a reasonable level to stay eligible. This can be done by contributing $20 a week directly to your KiwiSaver fund. It can take up to a month to process a Home Start grant and it is best to apply for a pre-approval for both the Home Start grant and Welcome Home Loan to make sure you are eligible. The pre-approval will last for six months, giving you time to find house with the knowledge that you have finance available.

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Living on NZ Super

Living on NZ Super

New Zealand is finally catching up with the rest of the world and considering changing the age of eligibility for NZ Superannuation from 65 to 67. However, the four-year process to make this transition doesn’t start for another twenty years. In the interim, the number of pensioners is burgeoning and life expectancy is increasing.

When the old age pension was first introduced it was intended to allow people to enjoy a few short years of rest before the end of life. That was in the days when people didn’t often live past their 70’s. NZ Superannuation is set at 65% of the national average wage. That’s enough to cover usual weekly expenses, but not enough to allow money to be saved to replace a car, maintain a house or enjoy overseas holidays. While it is possible to live from week to week on a low income for a few years, increased life expectancy means that retirees now face spending perhaps 30 years or so on a meagre income. During that time, there are many unexpected or unavoidable expenses which cause huge financial stress.

Statistics show that around 40% of pensioners rely solely on NZ Superannuation for their retirement income, and for a further 20%, NZ Superannuation makes up 80% of their income. The prospect of living on such a low income for a long time is a daunting one. For those pensioners who are lucky enough to have a retirement nest egg, investment returns are low. The combination of low pensions, low rates of investment return and increased longevity means that the elderly are facing an increasing probability of living in poverty in the final years of life. It is no surprise that 40% of people aged 65 to 68, and 20% of people aged 70 to 74, are still working.

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What to Expect From Your Financial Adviser

What to Expect From Your Financial Adviser

Financial service providers are regulated by the Financial Markets Authority (FMA). Part of the FMA’s role is to educate consumers of financial services and for that reason they have released a checklist of things you can expect from your financial services provider. Providers include financial advisers as well as KiwiSaver providers, fund managers and superannuation schemes. When dealing with a licensed provider, the FMA believes you are entitled to:

Competence. Your adviser should have the skills and experience to offer you the right product or service for your needs and should tell you if there are any limits to what they can provide and why.

Be treated honestly and fairly. Your adviser should balance their business with yours and tell you about any conflicts of interest, such as being paid a commission by a third party.

Be informed. Your adviser should help you understand your options and weigh up the pros and cons before you make a decision. They should keep in touch with you and help sort out any problems.

Know how much you are paying. Your adviser should tell you how much you will be paying now and in the future for their products and services.

Have problems and complaints dealt with properly. Your adviser should tell you how to make a complaint and be able to respond constructively. They also need to give you contact details for their dispute resolution scheme.

As a consumer of financial services, you need to make sure you ask the right questions to ensure you are receiving the information and treatment that you are entitled to. If you don’t get the right answers, walk away. If you are an existing customer and feel your entitlements have been breached, you can make a complaint to the provider or to their dispute resolution scheme.

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Money Management for Newlyweds

Money Management for Newlyweds

Relationships aren’t like they used to be a generation or two ago. The path to a ceremony is a more gradual one, with couples typically living together beforehand and sharing expenses. Women, through both necessity and choice, continue to earn an income after marriage and are confident in managing their own money. The result is that young couples are increasingly managing their financial affairs separately. Making a life-long commitment should be a trigger to review how money is managed within a relationship. Over a lifetime, a degree of financial interdependency can arise, especially if there are children. The ideal outcome is that each partner’s needs and wants are both respected and protected and money is managed effectively within the relationship to achieve common goals.

It is very common for partners to feel differently about how much money should be spent now rather than saved to spend later and how much money should be kept on hand as a slush fund in case of unexpected expenses. Some people are uncomfortable using credit cards, while others feel nervous about having debt. To avoid ongoing arguments about money, there needs to be agreement on these money basics. It is very important that each partner continues to have access to money of their own. There are two ways to achieve this. Incomes can be paid into a single account for joint expenses and goals with a transfer to each partner for personal spending. Alternatively, incomes can be paid to separate accounts with a transfer to a joint account for expenses and goals. It’s really a matter of deciding how much of each respective income should be used for joint purposes. In a healthy, committed relationship, allocating a high percentage of income to joint expenses and goals enables money to be used more effectively.

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Choosing When to Spend

Choosing When to Spend

There is nothing wrong with spending money. In fact money has no value unless it is spent. As they say, you can’t take it with you, so if you don’t spend your money during your lifetime, then someone else (the beneficiaries of your estate) will get the pleasure of spending it. During your working life and retirement, money will come to you on a regular basis unless something bad happens, such as the loss of your job, a business failure, or a severe health problem. How you fare in life financially will be determined by the timeframe in which you choose to spend the money you receive. As you receive money, you can choose whether to spend it now or later. If you choose to spend some later, you can choose how much later you wish to spend it.

Choosing to spend money later is called saving. Unfortunately, the word ‘saving’ has become associated with depriving yourself of enjoyment of life. The way to view saving is that in fact it increases your enjoyment of life – but in the future rather than now. There are three types of saving. Firstly, there is the saving you need to do to cover unexpected expenses and loss of income. Next, there is saving for big, one-off planned expenses such as holidays, a new car or home maintenance. These expenses occur in the medium term (the next five years or so). Then there is the saving you need to do for the long term, including retirement.

The art of managing your financial affairs prudently is to be able to correctly apportion your income into these different categories; money to be spent now, money for unexpected expenses and events, money for spending in the medium term, and money for spending in the long term.

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Investing for Children

Investing for Children

Parent and grandparents often want to set aside funds for their young children so they can be used to help further their later education or for some other worthwhile purpose. Here are some useful tips on how to do it in the best possible way.

First, consider the investment time frame. When is the earliest point you would wish the child to have access to the funds? If there is at least a five year time frame then some of the funds should be invested in assets that will grow in value over time, such as shares. For a shorter period, more stable assets such as term deposits may be more appropriate.

Putting funds into KiwiSaver is an option, however, the funds will only be accessible if they buy a first home, reach the official retirement age, leave the country or suffer hardship. There are diversified funds with investment profiles similar to KiwiSaver but which are not locked in. These funds are invested in a mix of fixed interest, property and shares.

Use the investment as a way of teaching your child about saving for the future. Review it with them once a year or so, and as the years go by explain more about how it works. They may choose to add more funds of their own to achieve a particular goal they have in mind.

Take heed that later in life, your child may enter into a relationship and, if you have invested a large sum on their behalf, you may wish to get advice on protecting it from a relationship property claim.

Given that student loans are generally interest-free, your child may be better to keep their funds invested through their study years and use them as a deposit on a home or to set up a business.

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Hammer Your Financial Commitments

Hammer Your Financial Commitments

It’s hard to save when there is a never-ending stream of bills to pay. One way to get sorted financially is to look closely and what your financial commitments are. Keeping your financial commitments to others well and truly under the hammer means more money for you.

Financial commitments are expenses that you have to pay on a defined day and are usually a specific amount. Rent, mortgage payments, credit cards, insurance and car registration are examples of financial commitments. There are five key strategies for keeping them under the hammer.

  1. Identify what your financial commitments are. Go back through your last three months or so of expenses and write down all the committed amounts you have paid to others.
  2. Use this list to work out your total annual commitments in dollars and then divide that by the number of pays you have. How much of your income is already committed to be paid to others before you get a chance to spend it?
  3. Your commitments can be further broken down into essential commitments and non-essential commitments. Gym memberships, magazine subscriptions, online subscriptions to music and movie channels are examples of non-essential commitments which, when added together, can chew up a big chunk of your income. Are these more important than your financial goals?
  4. Take a close look at your essential commitments such as rent, insurance, credit cards, phone and internet charges. Are you getting the best deals? Are you paying off debt on things you didn’t need to buy?
  5. Set up a separate bank account for your financial commitments and transfer enough money each pay day to cover the average cost per pay.

Every dollar you shave off your regular commitments will add up to a significant sum over a period of time.

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Keep Your Cool in Uncertain Times

Keep Your Cool in Uncertain Times

The world is full of uncertainties. How will Brexit play out? What effect will Trump’s outlandish statements and policies have on the global economy? Where is the New Zealand dollar heading? Will interest rates keep rising? In amongst all these uncertainties and more there is a large bunch of people wondering if their retirement funds are in jeopardy and whether they will be stuck in the workforce for much longer than planned. The reality is; there is no such thing as certainty (other than with regard to death and taxes); there are only degrees of uncertainty. So when it comes to making good financial decisions, a key skill is learning how to manage uncertainty.

There are natural instincts that come into play. Some people react to increased uncertainty by becoming highly cautious, some aren’t bothered at all, and some see uncertainty as an opportunity to make gains by taking risks. How you respond to uncertainty will have a significant impact on your financial outcomes.

The coming year is shaping up to be a very uncertain one. The key to being a successful investor is to learn to overcome emotions and make sound investment decisions based on objective analysis. An objective approach starts with determining your goals and the time frame for achieving them. If you have long term investment goals, don’t get distracted by short term changes in the market. Review your attitude towards risk and ensure your investment strategy is a good fit. Find the right balance between risk and return so you can achieve your goals while taking an acceptable level of risk. Stay diversified. Markets can change quickly, and moving all your investments into one asset class increases your risk.

Confident investors have a long term plan that they stick to. Just keep calm and carry on!

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Taking Care of Your Young Family

Taking Care of Your Young Family

Becoming a parent is one of life’s most exhilarating experiences and it changes things forever. Along with the joy comes the responsibility of ensuring a safe and nurturing environment for your children and the challenge of guiding them not only to be successful in life on their terms but to be good human beings.

Parenting is a serious business. There are responsibilities that come with the role of parent but unfortunately there is no instruction manual. One of the first lessons for a new parent is learning to put the needs of another person before theirs. This applies to physical, emotional and financial needs. Children are expensive and part of being a good parent is going without so children can have the necessities of life.

A study done by IRD in 2009 estimated that a middle income family with two children spent around 30% of their household income on their children. With three children, spending rises to 40% of income. So what happens when that income suddenly disappears? Tragically, just under 1800 people a year between the ages of 20 and 50 die and an even greater number become seriously ill and unable to work for a period of time. The consequences for the families of these people can be dire. There are three key ways in which parents can protect families.

  1. Make a Will. Dying without one leads to costly delays in making your financial assets such as personal bank accounts, KiwiSaver and life insurance claims available to your family.
  2. Buy life insurance, taking into account your overall budget
  3. Consider buying income protection or critical illness cover, especially if you are on a high income.

Your future income is your biggest financial asset. Make sure you protect it, for the sake of your family.

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